LabCorp Test

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) #1 Baseline Blood and Urine Blood Test Panel

Quick Overview

Thyroid + TSH, Complete Blood Count (CBC), Testosterone Total & Free, Urinalysis.

Test #861

$129.00

Availability: In stock

Preparation No fasting required. Stop biotin consumption at least 72 hours prior to the collection.
Test Results 3-4 days. May take longer based on weather, holiday or lab delays.


Because there are a variety of causes of Erectile Dysfunction (ED), there are several different blood tests available to help you and your doctor diagnose the condition and determine its cause. Only after the cause of ED is determined can it be effectively treated.

The Erectile Dysfunction #1 Baseline Blood & Urine Panel includes:

Thyroid Panel with Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH) - Thyroid function is crtical to your metabolism and affects your energy level, heart rate, weight control, and more. The thyroid-stimulating hormone is produced in the pituitary gland and stimulates the production of thyroid hormones. The TSH helps identify an underactive or overactive thyroid state. This comprehensive evaluation of your thyroid hormone levels includes: T-3 Uptake, T4, T7, and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH).

Complete Blood Count (CBC) - gives important information about the numbers and kinds of cells in the blood, especially red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. A CBC helps your health professional check any symptoms, such as fatigue, weakness, or bruising, that you may have. A CBC also helps your health professional diagnose conditions, such as infection, anemia, and several other disorders. Test includes: WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Platelets, Neutrophils, Lymphs, Monocytes, Eos, Basos, Neutrophils (Absolute), Lymphs (Absolute), Monocytes(Absolute), Eos (Absolute), Basos (Absolute), Immature Granulocytes, Immature Grans (Abs).

Testosterone Free Direct with Total Testosterone includes both Free Direct and Total Testosterone results. Testosterone is a type of hormone (a steroid hormone). It travels around the body in the blood. Some of it floats about in the blood freely without being attached to anything else. This is 'free' testosterone. Some testosterone is attached/bound to a protein called SHBG (sex hormone binding globulin). Some testosterone is attached to a protein called albumin. So 'total' testosterone is the sum of all the testosterone in the blood, no matter what it is bound to. Free testosterone is floating around by itself and only a few percent of testosterone is free.

Testosterone is a steroid hormone (androgen) that is produced by special endocrine tissue (the Leydig cells) in the male testes. Its production is controlled and controlled by luteinizing hormone (LH), which is manufactured in the pituitary gland. Testosterone works within a negative feedback mechanism, so as testosterone increases, LH decreases, while increased LH causes decreased testosterone. Testosterone levels are diurnal and peak in the early morning hours (about 4:00 to 8:00 am), and have the lowest levels in the evening (about 4:00 to 8:00 pm). Levels increase after exercise as well, but decrease with age. Nearly two-thirds of testosterone circulates in the blood bound to sex-hormone binding protein and slightly less than one-third is bound to albumin. A small percent circulates in the blood as free testosterone. The concentration of free testosterone is very low, normally <2% of the total testosterone concentration. In most women and men, >50% of total circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin, SHBG, and most of the remaining is bound to albumin. Routinely available assay methods that are used to measure total testosterone are not sensitive enough to accurately quantitate the free testosterone fraction directly. Free testosterone is estimated in this particular test by a direct, analogue radioimmunoassay method. This assay uses a labeled testosterone analogue that has a low binding affinity for both albumin and SHBG but is bound by antitestosterone antibody used in the assay. Since the analogue is unbound in the plasma, it then competes with free testosterone for binding sites on an antitestosterone antibody that is immobilized on the surface of the polypropylene tube.

Urinalysis Complete with Microscopic Examination - This test is useful in the evaluation of conditions such as urinary tract infection (UTI), dehydration, and kidney stones. It detects abnormalities of urine and urinary tract infection (UTI); diagnoses and manages renal diseases, urinary tract infection, urinary tract neoplasms, systemic diseases, and inflammatory or neoplastic diseases adjacent to the urinary tract.

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