Convenient. Affordable. Confidential.

Log In

Log In

Forgot Your Password?

Bone

The bones in a human body do a lot more than simply help provide structure for the body and help to protect vital organs.  Bones produce red and white blood cells, store important minerals, and hold on to muscles tightly so that when the muscles are flexed they pull on the bones, causing the body to move.  Without enough nutrients in the bones one can develop osteoporosis, a disease where an individual’s bones have a very low density, causing them to break and fracture more easily.  Bone is made up of connective tissue that binds together tightly to form a rigid organ.  Bones continue to change throughout one’s entire life. However, the most vital years for establishing healthy bones are between birth and age 30.  During this time, new bone forms as older bone breaks down.  When an individual is approximately 30 years old his or her bones are forming faster than they are breaking down and their total bone density increases.  After age 30, bone production slows down and individuals start to lose bone faster than they make it, resulting in lower bone density.  It is important to build as much as possible during the first 30 years of one’s life so that one has enough bone density to keep their bones healthy as their bones slowly lose density over the rest of their life.

 

Mineral Deficiency – Signs and Symptoms

Mineral deficiencies are not always easy to spot, and many people do not realize they have a deficiency until they are given a bone blood test.  However, there are several red flags for which individuals can look to spot a mineral deficiency.  Muscle cramping in the calves, feet, or toes is almost always a symptom of a deficiency in calcium, potassium, or magnesium.  Each of these minerals is very important in bone development.  Another warning sign of a magnesium deficiency is for one’s feet to emit a strong order.  A final, and telltale, sign that an individual has a mineral deficiency is an overall lack of energy or concentration.  If an individual experiences any of these symptoms, he or she should get a mineral blood test done as soon as possible.  Mineral deficiencies can be very dangerous and can take a long time correct. 

 

How the Blood Test Works

Bones store minerals such as vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate.  The body reabsorbs these minerals into the blood stream when they are needed.  Therefore, a bone mineral test showing too much or too little of one or more of these minerals in the blood may indicate a bone health problem.  An abnormal bone blood test may mean that mineral supplements need to be taken, or may indicate a significant enough deficiency to warrant a medication used to slow down the bone deterioration process.  Calcium, for example, is a crucial element in bone health but, as recent studies suggest, more than 40% of the United States population is calcium deficient.  A simple bone mineral test can be used to assess levels of calcium in the blood, as well as the levels other minerals related to bone health. 

8 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

Set Descending Direction
Switch View

8 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

Set Descending Direction
Switch View