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Hormone Clinic Profile, Men

The Hormone Clinic Profile, Men, evaluates hormone levels to help screen for hormone imbalances.


Test Code: 786

CPT Code: See Individual Tests

Also Known As:

Methodology:

See Individual Tests

Preparation:

No fasting is required. Patients should stop biotin consumption at least 72 hours prior to the collection.

Test Results:

3-4 days. May take longer based on weather, holiday, or lab delays.


Details:

Please note: Any result for the Testosterone Free (Direct) and Total Testosterone Test in excess of 1500 will be reported as >1500


Test Code: 2265

CPT Code: See Individual Tests

Also Known As:

Methodology:

See Individual Tests

Preparation:

No fasting is required. Patients should stop biotin consumption at least 72 hours prior to the collection.

Test Results:

3-4 days. May take longer based on weather, holiday, or lab delays.

Description

The Hormone Clinic Profile, Men, includes:

DHEA-S

Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) is an androgen, a male sex hormone in the blood of both men and women. It plays a role in developing male secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. It can be metabolized by the body into more potent androgens, such as testosterone and androstenedione, or can be changed into the female hormone estrogen. DHEA-S is produced by the adrenal cortex, the outer layer of the adrenal glands, with smaller amounts produced by the woman's ovaries and the man's testes. DHEA-S secretion is controlled by the pituitary hormone, which is known as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and other pituitary factors. Since the adrenal glands primarily produce DHEAS, it is helpful as a marker for adrenal function. Adrenal tumors, cancers, and hyperplasia can lead to the overproduction of DHEA-S. While elevated DHEA-S levels may not be detected in adult men, they can lead to visible virilization symptoms and amenorrhea.

 

Testosterone, Total and Free

Small amounts are produced in women's ovaries, and levels are tested to evaluate virilization. The concentration of free testosterone is deficient, typically <2% of the total testosterone concentration. In most men and women, >50% of total circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin, SHBG, and most of the rest is albumin. Free testosterone is estimated in this test by a direct, analog radioimmunoassay method. This assay uses a labeled testosterone analog that has a low binding affinity for both SHBG and albumin but is bound by the anti-testosterone antibody used in the assay. Since the analog is unbound in the plasma, it competes with free testosterone for binding sites on an anti-testosterone antibody that is immobilized on the surface of the polypropylene tube.

 

Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH) 

This test is commonly used to diagnose a thyroid disorder in someone with symptoms, screen newborns for an underactive thyroid, monitor thyroid replacement therapy in people with hypothyroidism, diagnose and monitor female infertility problems, help evaluate the function of the pituitary gland (occasionally), and screen adults for thyroid disorders. Although, expert opinions vary on the benefits of screening and at what age to begin.

 

Triiodothyronine (T3)

Triiodothyronine, known as T3, is a vital thyroid hormone that controls metabolism and ensures that the body can complete essential functions appropriately. Although most T3 in the blood is bound to proteins, some are unbound or free. The free T3 test measures the active form of T3 that is unbound. Therefore, a healthcare provider may order a Free T3 blood test to evaluate thyroid function if a thyroid disorder (hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism) is suspected. In addition, the free T3 test may also be used to evaluate pituitary gland problems, assess the severity and type of thyroid disease, and monitor treatment for a thyroid condition.

 

Free T4 

Free T4 is the active form of thyroxine and is thought to be a more accurate reflection of thyroid hormone function. The free T4 test is considered by many to be a more accurate reflection of thyroid hormone function, and, in most cases, its use has replaced that of the total T4 test. A total T4 or free T4 test is primarily ordered in response to an abnormal TSH result. However, sometimes the T4 will be ordered along with a TSH to give the healthcare provider a complete evaluation of the adequacy of the thyroid hormone feedback system. These tests are usually ordered when an individual has symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism.

 

Estradiol

Estrogen is a group of hormones primarily responsible for developing female sex organs and secondary sex characteristics. The three main estrogen fractions are estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3). Estradiol (E2) is produced in women, mainly in the ovary. In men, the testes and adrenal glands are the principal sources of estradiol. In women, normal estradiol levels provide for proper ovulation, conception, and pregnancy, promoting healthy bone structure and regulating cholesterol levels.

 

Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF-1)

IGF-1, also known as SM-C/IGF-1, is produced in the liver in response to stimulation by growth hormone secreted by the pituitary gland. An IGF-1 Blood Test is commonly ordered for patients with symptoms that indicate insufficient or excess production of human growth hormone (HGH) and IGF-1. Such symptoms include gigantism, slow or delayed growth and development in children, acromegaly, or decreased bone density and muscle strength in adults. The test is also used if an underactive pituitary gland is suspected or to monitor patients undergoing HGH therapy.

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